How To Preflight in Acrobat [VIDEO]

How to Preflight in Acrobat Title

Have you ever printed something for your company and the print job didn’t come out like you expected it to? Fortunately, there’s a way to check for mistakes and errors before going through the printing process. In this video by Robert Vernon, he explains how to preflight your PDFs using Acrobat. Preflighting is the process of checking if the digital data required to print a job are all present and valid. So, if your colors are lame RGBs, the preflight process will keep them bright, colorful, and CMYK.

Video Transcription:

Robert Vernon here from Digital Arts and I want to show you today how to preflight a file in acrobat. There are some great tools built into acrobat that will give you all kinds of information about your file.

 

I’m going to go ahead and open up a file here. The reason we preflight, of course, is to catch all of the problems that may be associated with a file with a PDF before it goes into production. We want the presses the run smoothly. We want pre-press to not have to call the customers and we want everything to go as smoothly as possible.

 

So, I’ve opened up a PDF here, it’s a one page PDF. You can check the size by putting your cursor in the lower left. This is 8 ½ x 11. Now, to preflight, you’re going to go up here to the advanced tab and all the way at the bottom you’ll see preflight. A lot of people don’t realize it’s there. But, if you select it, you’ll see that there’s a lot going for it.

 

Now, when you pull it up you’re going to see you have choices of all different kinds of profiles. If you’re going to Sheet Fed or Web Press, you’d select these. We do digital printing so I’m going to go ahead and select digital printing here, color, and we’re going to go ahead and analyze the file. Click the analyze tab, and it’s going to go into the file and give me a great report. Well, we see here there’s some transparency issues. I’m going to select overview, and let’s just check color spaces. Well, we see we have RGB and we also can look at the fonts, comic sans ms, and we can look at the images again. A lot of RGB. I can go back to profiles and select analyze and fix.

 

Now, it’s going to ask for a new name and I don’t want to overwrite the original file, so I’m going to go ahead and put DAI in front of it and save. Now it’s going to go ahead and correct those problems and give us a new report after it does so. Right now you can see it’s converting RGB to CMYK, it’s flattening the transparency, and now no problems were found. It also recompressed LZW ZIP, of course, LZW is a problem with a lot of rips. And it’s that easy!

 

Really, go ahead and experiment with it. I think you’ll find that this will really simplify your workflow and allow you to catch a lot of problems early in the workflow that you have in your shop. Any questions, give me a call or email. You can reach me at robert@digitalartsimaging.com or at 908-237-4646. Thanks!

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